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i first stared with a recurve shooting aluminum arrows. then i moved on to self bows, and now im ordering some wooden shafts to make my own arrows. it really depends on what yo want. im buying sitka spruce shafts, cause it known for its strength and durability, its one of the superior arrow woods.

if u get the wood ones remember to properly seal the shaft so no moisture can get it, or else it can rot or warp. and if the arrow splits it can easily be repaired too by raping it with sinew or something.
also what kind of bow u shootng?
 

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I started shooting wood arrows several years ago because it was a requirement to shoot in the longbow class at some tournaments. Now, I just like them. They have their own personality, much like a bow, and seem to be quieter and more forgiving (that may just be in my head).

I've shot fir, spruce, maple, Norwegian pine, Lodgepole pine, chundoo, ash, and probably several others I can't recall at the moment. I always wind up going back to Port Orford Cedar (POC).

Getting quality shafts makes a BIG difference, regardless of the wood. I think the best wood in the world could be made into a really crappy shaft. Straight, tight grain and very few grain runouts are what you are looking for. Consistent weight and spine are a must for consistent accuracy--spine moreso than weight IMO, at least at closer (hunting) distances. Hand spined is better than machine spined--the machine doesn't know or care which way the shaft falls into the trough. Most folks that hand spine will spine each shaft the same way--either with or against the grain (usually against). You will need to put your nocks on the same way. Rogue River Archery put a little dot on their shafts to indicate how it was spined, and which way you need to glue the nock on. I glue mine on so the string is against the grain.

Finish is important--wood shafts will absorb moisture, which will cause them to warp and can have an effect on the spine. I like an epoxy finish a buddy of mine told me about. It's simple, fairly cheap, and works better than anything I've ever used.

Getting good shafting isn't usually cheap. Every time I've ever bought cheap shafting that's just what I got--cheap shafting. Making your own arrows is time consuming, especially if you dip, crest, etc. Buying finished arrows, especially fancy ones, can be as much as a aluminum or some carbons. They do break. You need to check them on a regular basis, especially if one takes a hard hit. A cracked shaft released from your bow can wind up going through your hand or arm.

They are worth it to me though. Danged if I know why, but I love 'em.

Chad
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I shoot a longbow (50lbs @ 28"). I was shooting with a guy today that was shooting woods. His arrows were going like darts while my 2016's were all over the place. Got me thinking those woods might help my shooting,
 

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I've used wood for quite awhile and have had excellant results. .

If you make your own, make sure the rift is on the top and bottom of your arrow. If you don't get the grain against the side plate of your bow you'll experience huge variation in spine. Back in the old days the primary purpose of the cock feather was to insure your wood arrow wasn't up-side down... The "v" of the rift should run toward the tip on the top of the arrow and run back toward the bow on the bottom of the arrow. The spine weight of the shaft should always be tested against the grain and then the grain must be against the side plate of your bow.

Good Hunting
Chris
 

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DC, I do shoot wood arrows, and some aluminum. I shoot them because I want to and because I like wood arrows, not because they are the best, just the best for my tastes. I would say, if you want tough, accurate arrows that you dont have to replace, buy the carbon arrows. They seem to be "the best" if you will. However, I dont know much about them and from waht I read, Carbons seem verry fussy about how they are built, weights, inserts, special glues etc.etc. Here is what you need to make a good wood arrow. A propperly spined shaft, polyurethane finish, a point,nock, feathers, and glue. Thats all. Wood arrows are going to require maintenance some times, but real good ones will not need much! Its all about puting yourself into your gear and learning how to care for your arrows etc. Once you get a good set of wood arrows you will feel happy about having them to shoot. They have a character that you have to feel for yourself. You may have to tune a little differntly for larger diameter shafting, but you probably wont. You can still shoot the other materials too.
 
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