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Discussion Starter #1
[I’m sorry for the length]

I’m looking to get into traditional archery for the first time. Like others, I’ve been lurking on here and doing Google searches trying to find as much info as possible. I’ve shot bows before, but it’s been YEARS. I really love the look and traditional nature of recurve bows and want to go that route at this point. I’ll be sticking to simple target shooting and am just looking to see how far my interest in this sport will take me. I have (according to the wingspan measurement and divide by 2.5 method) a 28.4-28.6 draw length. I’ve seen often on here that beginners should go to a pro shop and try different bows out. I’ve not been able to locate a pro shop near me (most seem to be 1 hr+ of my location which is a bit of a problem at the moment). With all of this in mind, these are the ideas I have and wanted to get some feedback/advice before proceeding:

I’m thinking about going with a t/d setup, as these seem the most customizable/upgradable. I would like to stay under/around $200 for my initial setup including the necessities such as stringer, arm guard, tab/glove, and several complete arrows (I think that’s everything I’d need to start?). I’ve read over and over the advice that beginners should start with and ILF riser and lighter weight limbs (30-35#). From the research I’ve done on the internet, there seems to be many manufacturers of ILF risers. Is this a style of riser? This question is just for my own edification, as most of these risers seem well out of my price range, but it’s info I’d like to know for later on.

I’ve found Sammick, Sebastian Flute, and Fleetwood T/D recurve bows that seem decently priced ($100-$140). I assume any or all of these would be upgradable to different weighted limbs as I progress. Which brings me to my next question: How do I tell if limbs will fit the riser I choose? Looking at the limbs available on sites such as Lancaster AS, it seems like (at least how LAS has listed them) that certain limbs are only for certain risers and are not interchangeable, but I get a different notion from reading the posts on here.

My next question is about the length of the bow. How long of a bow do I get? I’ve seen info out there that says for my DL and height (5’11” BTW) I should be anywhere from 62”-70”. How do I decide this?

I think this is everything (for now). I thank you for reading this incredibly loooooong post and for any and all advice I can get!
 

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Hello~ I went through this same problem a year ago...

I think for the size of the bow, you should get a medium sized riser with medium limbs (making it a 68'' bow), some people might suggest a medium riser with long limbs (70'').
But I do not think anyone will recommend getting anything below a 68'' bow, since those sizes are for smaller people with shorter draw lengths.

As for the limb fittings, any riser that takes ILF should take limbs that are ILF. Anything labeled differently (like Formula limbs) have problems with compatibility.
And for $200, I believe most of it will go to getting your full arrow set up, but what about a sight (or are you going barebow)?

Lastly, I would HIGHLY discourage getting any riser from Sebastian Flute... Not a good idea...
My first riser was the SF Premium riser and it caused my so much headaches.
Its adjustments are nearly impossible to change, I've seen limbs break off the limb bolts (causing a bow "explosion"), and overall it is not anything near "Premium."
I suggest getting the Raven Prestige FX (which was the Samick Vision 2, and the someone/thing changed the name) for $200 on Lancaster AS: its sturdy, adjustments actually listen to you, and it is a really good bow for the price.

I hope that helped some!
 

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ILF is a style of interchangeable limbs and risers. Cheapest ILF setup I know if is an Axiom+ riser and limbs for about $250. When I purchased mine that included plunger, rest and string but thats it.


Best way to approximate your draw span, IMO, is to take a tape measure and put it in the crook between thumb and forefinger then act like you're drawing a bow (keep shoulders relaxed and square to maximize the length) then draw back to anchor and lock the tape. The wingspan divide measure don't work great. According to that my draw is a full 1" shorter than it actually is.

On the Sammick low end bows most of the limbs interchange: Polaris, Sage, Journey can all be swapped. Many of the similar looking bows are the same with different branding.
 

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Check out the Samick Sage. I just picked one up not too long ago for a training bow. I really like it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Spritebottle - The Raven seems to be out of my current price range, but it's definitely something I'll look into later on. As far as a sight goes, I was planning on going bare bow until I get used to just the basics of actually shooting.

Yugami - Thanks for the heads up on the DL. It's 29" measuring that way. Does that change things much?

Cladinator - I've looked at the Sage. It seems like it'd be good to start with (a lot of other users have posted tales similar to yours). From what I can find online, it seems like the Sage is a 62" bow which brings me back to the question of how do I determine how long of a bow I should get?
 

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CAS- I have both the Samick Sage and Samick Polaris. Both are excellent bows that are inexpensive to start with. I got my Sage from twig archery and was able to get set up for right around $200. The Polaris does come in a 66'' option I believe, and it is about $30 cheaper than the Sage, so it sounds like it would be a perfect fit for your bill. Great archery shops to order from online would be Lancaster, 3Rivers, or TwigArchery, any one of those should be able to get you everything you need to start flinging arrows at your price range if you went with the Polaris. Hope this all helps!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thin Man - Thank you. Yes, I've looked at that post already. It says that length is personal preference. I've also seen posts on here that say shorter bows can't accommodate longer DLs. Not that I'm saying 29" DL or is huge. I just want to make sure I get a bow that can grow with me.

Bytes back - Thanks for pointing me towards Twig. They don't have the 66" Polaris. They only have it in 62" (I think). But, they have the Journey in 64". I'm now leaning towards that but also thinking about the SF Inferno in 66". LAS has both and they're similar in price. The biggest reason I'm still leaning towards the Journey is because of the available limbs and the fact that SF got a really bad review above. The Journey can go from 30#-60# and the Inferno only goes up to 34#. So, as I improve, I can upgrade the Journey but not so much the Inferno. LAS also has the 66" Polaris but it only goes up to 36#. I guess my only real question is about bow length. Will the 2" make that much of a difference?
 

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Don't forget that the bow grows muscle as your draw length grows, and it probably will. Take the 36lb Polaris as an example. It could be 38lb or more at 29 inches and your draw length is likely to expand to 30 inches over time. Now you have a 40+lb bow.
 

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CAS-Forest has a good point above, since you have a longer than average DL, your bow weight will actually average +2lbs per inch over 28". So if you got the 64'' Journey 35lbs at 28", you would actually be drawing closer to 40lbs, if not over when your DL extends in time. Keep that in mind when choosing a bow weight. The Journey has gotten really good reviews, and could be a good fit for you with a 29"DL. Your DL may extend up to 30" in your first year of shooting, but I think you'd still be safe from stacking with a 64" bow. More experienced minds may chime in here an correct me, as I am still in my first year of learning archery, but this is the impression I get from the information I've seen here since I joined.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I now realize that my last post wasn't clear. I didn't mean to suggest going with a heavy bow right off. If I choose the Journey or Polaris, I'd start with the 30# @ 28" (which would put me at about 32# @ a 29" DL, right?). If I go with the Inferno I'd start with 26# @ 28" (or 28# @ 29"). I was trying (and failing) to explain why I'm leaning towards the Journey. With the Polaris and Infero, I'd only be able to increase weight once or twice before having to buy a new bow, but the Journey would allow me to increase several times which would allow me to save up to buy a really good set up later on.
 

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I don't have any of the bows that you are talking about, but do own bows from 58 inches long to 68 inches long. I have come to the conclusion that length of the bow is not absolute. It depends a lot on the bow. For example, I have a 37# bow at 58 inches long that shows no sign of non linear draw, stacking, up to 28 inches. It is smooth and really fun to shoot.

I have a 60 inch bow with a 40# draw that seems to go nonlinear at about 20 inches of draw and stays that way. It does seem to throw arrows at a higher velocity, but is hard. Then I have a 66 and 68 inch bow that are functionally interchangeable. Both smooth and linear. I currently shoot the shorter of the two the most.

Almost all bows will be good out to the 28 inch measurement point. I would suggest longer rather than shorter, but I don't believe there is a magic number.

The shocker for me was the price of arrows. Figure about $50 for half a dozen. That leaves less for the bow. I bought used bows which kept the price within my budget.
 

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CAS- My apologies, I wasnt trying to imply you were going too heavy at all, that never crossed my mind. I just meant to remind you to keep in mind that draw weight goes up with draw length, so you knew what weight you would be drawing with any bow you chose. Sorry for any misunderstanding :) I think the Journey would be an excellent bow for you to start on.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Nekekal - Speaking of arrows, I'm thinking about going with Easton Tribute 1916s full length (31"). I can get them fletched and with nocks for $25 for a half dozen from LAS. Am I correct in assuming that, as far as arrows go, starting out, the length is more important? That it's better to be overspined than to have an arrow that's too short? I can get everything I need from LAS for ~$230 including shipping. A bit over, but not out the realm of possibilities.

Bytesback - No need for apologies. When I reread my post from last night this morning, I had NO clue what I was saying. :)

Thank everyone for their help and advice up to this point. It's been invaluable!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
1816s, if I'm correct, are only 30" long. Would this be a problem with a 29" DL?
 

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Hello~ I went through this same problem a year ago...

I think for the size of the bow, you should get a medium sized riser with medium limbs (making it a 68'' bow), some people might suggest a medium riser with long limbs (70'').
But I do not think anyone will recommend getting anything below a 68'' bow, since those sizes are for smaller people with shorter draw lengths.

As for the limb fittings, any riser that takes ILF should take limbs that are ILF. Anything labeled differently (like Formula limbs) have problems with compatibility.
And for $200, I believe most of it will go to getting your full arrow set up, but what about a sight (or are you going barebow)?

Lastly, I would HIGHLY discourage getting any riser from Sebastian Flute... Not a good idea...
My first riser was the SF Premium riser and it caused my so much headaches.
Its adjustments are nearly impossible to change, I've seen limbs break off the limb bolts (causing a bow "explosion"), and overall it is not anything near "Premium."
I suggest getting the Raven Prestige FX (which was the Samick Vision 2, and the someone/thing changed the name) for $200 on Lancaster AS: its sturdy, adjustments actually listen to you, and it is a really good bow for the price.

I hope that helped some!
Interesting, in that the SF Forged Plus seems to be among the most highly recommended risers for individuals just starting out. That riser goes for about $250 new.
 

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Interesting, in that the SF Forged Plus seems to be among the most highly recommended risers for individuals just starting out. That riser goes for about $250 new.
The Forged + is a fantastic riser. The Premium has a less easily used alignment system, but so long as you follow the directions it works fine.

-Grant
 
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